Invasive species are plants, animals or other organisms not native to BC whose introduction and spread harms the province’s native species, economy and human health.

Invasive Species in Pitt Meadows

  • Parrot's Feather
  • European Chafer Beetle
  • Knotweeds
  • Goldfish
  • Oriental Weatherfish
  • Mosquito Control
  • Himalayan Blackberry

For more information about how to recognize and mange these common local invasive species, vist Metro Vancouver's Invasive Species site

Why should you care?

Most invasive species are unintentionally introduced by human activities into places outside their native habitat and, once they’re removed from natural predators and diseases they often reproduce, spread and choke out native species.

With few limits on their populations invasive species can easily take over sensitive ecosystems permanently upsetting the balance of plant, insect, bird and other animal life. Local governments, including Pitt Meadows, spend thousands of dollars each year to try to manage invasive species in our communities.

How can you help?

Report It

If you see a plant that looks out of place or a creature you don’t recognize and have concerns about, we encourage you to report it. Invasive species tend to pop up in areas that we frequent – like dog walking trails and local parks, or along roadsides and in ditches. Thank you for taking action by reporting invasive species you see!

Volunteer

Help protect British Columbia through the BC Invasives volunteer program. Become a volunteer here.

Learn More

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I dispose of invasive species?

Contact the City Operations department at 604.465.2434 for any disposal advice. All removed invasive plant material should be disposed of properly. If you are a resident looking to dispose of invasive plants or soil containing invasive species, be aware that some facilities may not accept the material due to risk of further spread. DO NOT put invasive plants in a backyard composter as the temperature will not get hot enough to destroy these plants and their seeds. BC Earth Exchange, on Bonson Road & Fraser Way, offers pick up of Knotweed removed from private property.

What should I do if I see an invasive plant on public property?

If you see a plant that looks out of place or a creature you don’t recognize and have concerns about, we encourage you to report it. Invasive species tend to pop up in areas that we frequent – like dog walking trails and local parks, or along roadsides and in ditches. Thank you for taking action by reporting invasive species you see!

To identify which type of invasive plant species you’ve encountered, please visit the ISC Website.  

We continue to work with other levels of government and local environmental groups to ensure that we develop a detailed inventory of invasive plants found in our parks, water courses and protected lands.

What do I do if I find invasive plants on my private property?

The B.C. Weed Control Act imposes a duty on all land occupiers to control designated noxious plants.  The purpose for the Act is to protect our natural resources and industry from the negative impacts of foreign weeds.

We recommend that citizens contact a qualified business whose applicators have the ‘Pesticide User License' certification.  While we know that some may be tempted to take the ‘DIY' approach, the concern is that the foliar spraying of invasive plants in the wrong concentrations or under the wrong conditions may end up doing collateral damage to other plants in your garden, or your neighbour's garden.

What does the City do about mosquito control?

The City participates in the Metro Vancouver Regional Nuisance Mosquito Control Program. Carried out by professional mosquito contractor Morrow BioScience Ltd., the program involves routine monitoring and sampling as well as the use of larvicides.

To report mosquito-related concerns, call 604.432.6228.

To learn more about mosquito management, visit our service provider's website: Morrow BioScience Ltd.

Mosquito FAQ

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